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We The Future: Accelerating Sustainable Development Solutions

Organized by
The Skoll Foundation, United Nations Foundation, and TED

September 21
9.00 AM – 5.00 PM
Soho, New York

MORE INFORMATION
(Access to live-streaming available on the website)


For additional information, email wtfuture@skoll.org

 

The Sustainable Development Goals, created in partnership with individuals around the world and adopted by world leaders at the United Nations, present a bold vision for the future: a world without poverty or hunger, in which all people have access to healthcare, education and economic opportunity, and where thriving ecosystems are protected. The 17 goals are integrated and interdependent, spanning economic, social, and environmental imperatives.

Incremental change will not manifest this new world by 2030. Such a shift requires deep, systemic change. As global leaders gather for the 72nd Session of the UN General Assembly in September, this is the moment to come together to share models that are transforming the way we approach the goals and equipping local and global leaders across sectors to accelerate achievement of the SDGs.

Together with innovators from around the globe, We The Future will showcase and discuss bold models of systemic change that have been proven and applied on a local, regional, and global scale. A curated audience of social entrepreneurs, corporate pioneers, government innovators, artistic geniuses, and others will explore how we can learn from, strengthen, and scale the approaches that are working to create a world of sustainable peace and prosperity.
6
Breaking Down Siloes, Building Synergies: Implementing NCDs in the SDG Era

Organized by NCD Alliance

September 18
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM (Reception co-hosted by PATH & NCD Alliance)
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Program)
Westin New York Grand Central Hotel (Madison Ballroom)
New York, New York

RSVP

This side event, held on the margins of the 72nd UN General Assembly, will explore the opportunities available for implementing actions that will support the achievement of the NCD target in the SDGs, the overarching health goal, and other relevant health-related targets. Panelists will specifically focus on the interlinkages between health and NCDs with other sustainable development priorities (e.g. poverty, nutrition, environment, gender, and trade and economic growth), the necessary approaches and responses to ensure “win-win” solutions for health and other sectors, and the investment needed to drive these actions forward.

6
Advocating for Change for Adolescents

Organized by Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, Every Woman Every Child (EWEC), and Women Deliver

September 18
2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
EWEC Hub, UN Main Building, North Lawn
New York, New York

RSVP by September 15

5
GHC NEWS FLASH: GLOBAL HEALTH ROUNDUP 7/10/2017

Join GHC at the Global Health Security Roundtable and Faith and Global Health Caucus
GHC is relaunching its Global Health Security Roundtable, which will be meeting today, July 10, at 3 pm EDT in Washington, DC. Read more about the Roundtable and learn how to join the listserv.

A small group of members is relaunching the Faith and Global Health Caucus. Open to all faiths, the Caucus will meet quarterly to share best practices and provide a fellowship-centered space. The first meeting is onJuly 17 at 5 pm EDT in Washington, DC. Learn more and RSVP.


Powerful Discussions on the Sustainable Development Goals
On July 17, Global Compact Network USA will host an event on the role of the private sector in advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 2017 Symposium will bring together companies, nonprofits, and United Nations entities to explore practical actions that we can all take to advance the SDGs. The event will take place at Pfizer Headquarters in New York City, on the heels of the High-Level Political Forum on SDGs (HLPF 2017). View registration details for this event and visit GHC’s special events calendar for more information on health-related side-events at HLPF 2017.


Reducing Global Inequities in Maternal and Child Health
A recent study by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) reveals that the number of lives saved by investing in the most deprived populations is almost twice as high as the number saved by equivalent investment in less deprived groups. Study findings show that increased access to key interventions reduced under-five mortality in 51 countries that are collectively home to 400 million children under age five. The report analyzes six critical indicators: antenatal care visits, skilled birth attendants, early initiation of breastfeeding, malaria prevention, full immunization, and care-seeking for sick children. View the report and interactive data site.


Global Development Alliance Annual Program Statement Deadline Extended
The Global Development Alliance (GDA) Annual Program Statement (APS) deadline has been extended until February 23, 2018. The GDA APS is USAID’s open invitation to the private sector to co-create and implement transformational partnerships to tackle both business and global development challenges that have a sustainable development impact. Through leveraging expertise, resources, and capabilities from various stakeholders, GDA APS addresses critical business and development challenges using market-based approaches. Learn more.

We cannot afford to leave women out

This guest post was written by Catharine Taylor, Vice President, Health Programs Group, Management Sciences for Health.

Photo: Women in Malawi are increasingly engaging in sustainable ways to grow household income and end poverty. Credit: Feed the Children / Amos Gumulira

The evidence is clear: to achieve progress in the world, now is the time to prioritize and invest in women and girls. As key drivers of sustainable development, when women are empowered to fully participate in society, everyone benefits. We know, for instance, that women spend more of their income on their families than men do – prioritizing healthcare, nutrition, and education, setting up families and communities for more prosperous futures. We also know that when women are empowered to care for themselves and their children’s health from pregnancy through childhood and adolescence, families and communities grow stronger and more productive.

As I prepare to join the Commission on the Status of Women next week, where the focus will be on women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work, I am reminded of a visit to Malawi last month. For many years, women in the country’s remote villages had no access to health care during pregnancy and childbirth, which meant no information on how to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy for themselves and their baby, and no care if and when complications arose, almost certainly resulting in death. But now, more than 90 percent of all women in Malawi go to a health care facility to deliver their children, up from only 53 percent in 2000. The investments in midwifery education and an expanding system to make healthcare free for the poorest have greatly contributed to better quality of care and improved health outcomes. Women’s participation in Village Savings and Loans associations, agribusiness groups, and livestock activities has increased markedly in the past few years, securing women‘s access to household income and greater engagement in non-traditional roles.

The power of investing in women is paying off.

Today, there’s a new generation of young Malawian women who are finding that family planning tools are helping them take charge of their futures. And there are more and more women confronting barriers to education and adding their voice in the workforce or in political spheres. By focusing on women and children, the country has also made incredible progress in addressing the HIV and AIDS epidemic, reducing the number of new HIV infections per year by more than half in just over ten years.

Under the new sustainable development agenda, countries and development actors from across the spectrum have an opportunity to work together to help communities ensure that women and girls have access to a comprehensive range of services promoting their right to health. On International Women’s Day, we at Management Sciences for Health mark the achievements of women and call for continued recognition that investments in global development programs yield a return that improves our security, prosperity, and advances the values of our nation. By helping women drive development to advance their health and well-being and that of their families, their communities, and societies, we will build lasting change that benefits all.


Catharine Taylor is the Vice President of the Health Programs Group at Management Sciences for Health – a leading organization dedicated to building stronger health systems for greater health impact. Catharine is an internationally recognized expert in maternal, newborn, and child health policies and programs, a champion for women’s health and rights, and an advocate for universal, equitable access to high-quality care. Follow Catharine on twitter @CTaylor_MSHVeep.