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22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018)

Organized by the International AIDS Society

22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018)
July 23 – 27
Amsterdam, the Netherlands

MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION

The International AIDS Conference is the largest conference on any global health or development issue in the world. First convened during the peak of the AIDS epidemic in 1985, it continues to provide a unique forum for the intersection of science, advocacy, and human rights. Each conference is an opportunity to strengthen policies and programmes that ensure an evidence-based response to the epidemic. The 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) will be hosted in Amsterdam, Netherlands 23-27 July 2018.

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Global HIV/AIDS Financing Amidst Uncertainty

Organized by Center for Strategic and International Studies & the Kaiser Family Foundation

April 18
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
2nd Floor Conference Center
Center for Strategic & International Studies
1616 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington, DC

MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION

(This event will be webcast)

On Wednesday, April 18 from 12:00 PM – 1: 30 PM, the CSIS Global Health Policy Center and the Kaiser Family Foundation will co-host a discussion on the current state of financing for the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. The event will also serve as the launch of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME)’s Financing Global Health 2017 annual report and an updated IHME interactive data visualization resource. IHME’s latest analysis of global health financing trends features a special focus on the past 20 years of global spending on HIV/AIDS across 188 countries, raising questions about the current state of HIV/AIDS financing amidst the present policy landscape. Please direct any questions to Alex Bush (abush@csis.org).

Welcome & Opening Remarks: Sara M. Allinder, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, CSIS Global Health Policy Center

Keynote Presentation: Christopher J.L. Murray, Professor and Director, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington

Panel Discussion
1) Jennifer Kates, Vice President and Director of Global Health and HIV Policy, Kaiser Family Foundation
2) Mark Dybul, Professor and Faculty Co-Director, Center for Global Health and Quality, Georgetown University Medical School
3) Christopher J.L. MurrayProfessor and Director, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington

Moderated by: J. Stephen Morrison, Senior Vice President and Director, CSIS Global Health Policy Center

Light refreshments served starting at 11:30 AM.

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GHC NEWS FLASH: GLOBAL HEALTH ROUNDUP 4/17/2017

GHC at CUGH and GlobeMed
Early this month, GHC President and Executive Director Loyce Pace participated in two key events that engaged university-based stakeholders. At the GlobeMed Summit in Chicago, Loyce led a workshop on the power of storytelling for advocacy. GlobeMed students and alumni members offered insightful takeaways about online initiatives and developed mock campaigns for specific audiences and channels that incorporated potential calls to action. She spoke on a student-led panel the following weekend at the 2017 CUGH Conference about what we need most from the next generation of global health leaders. Now, more than ever, we must build our capacity across the community to respond to challenges faced by global health. GHC is ready to equip new advocates with the tools they need to be successful. To that end, GHC will host an advocacy session at the next CORE Group meeting and deliver an address at SwitchPoint in an effort to motivate and mobilize global health implementers worldwide. We hope to see you at these events!


Upcoming GHC Webinars
Global Financing Facility (GFF) Spring Webinar Series On April 21, GHC and the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) will co-host a briefing in preparation for the GFF Investors Group April Meeting. The briefing will be held via webinar and in-person in Washington, DC. A key discussion item on the agenda is the integration of feedback received from the recent public consultation on the draft GFF Civil Society Engagement Strategy. View registration details.

World Health Assembly (WHA) Policy Scrums – The second WHA Policy Scrum will be held on April 25 via webinar and will focus on the U.S. government’s future engagement with WHO in preparation for the upcoming WHA. If you missed our first WHA Policy Scrum, you can catch-up on the main takeaways from the session or listen to the full recording. View registration details.


New Global Initiative Aims to Reduce Medication Errors
Unsafe medication practices and errors are a leading cause of injury and healthcare-associated harm around the world. WHO estimates the global cost associated with medication errors at $42 billion annually – almost 1% of total global health expenditure.  In response to this, WHO has launched the Global Patient Safety Challenge on Medication Safety to address weaknesses in health systems that lead to medication errors which result in severe harm to patients. The Challenge aims to make improvements in each stage of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing, administering, monitoring, and use. It will focus on four major areas: patients and the public; health care professionals; medicines as products; and systems and practices of medication. Read more.


Call for Participation in Annual HIV/AIDS Resource Tracking Project
Funders Concerned about AIDS (FCAA) requests your participation in the annual HIV/AIDS resource tracking project. FCAA is currently compiling data on HIV/AIDS-related grants disbursed in calendar year 2016. The FCAA resource tracking project consists of three main tools: the annual report, Philanthropic Support to Address HIV/AIDS; the online funding map, which currently provides total funding and engaged philanthropic organizations per region, country, and U.S. state; and subsequent analysis in the form of blogs, infographics, presentations, and articles, which provide a deep dive on funding for a specific issue, population or geography. Submitted data will inform the three mentioned tools. If you would like to contribute, please review FCAA’s data privacy policy and submit a list of your HIV/AIDS-related grants, with grant descriptions, to Caterina Gironda by May 6.


Integrating Cervical Cancer Prevention with HIV Programs
The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria and GHC member Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon recently signed an agreement to collaborate on programming to prevent cervical cancer. This new alliance aims to increase access to cost-effective cervical cancer prevention and treatment services for HIV-positive women, who are up to five times more likely to develop cervical cancer. Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon will work with countries to integrate cervical cancer programming into their HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund. The Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has applauded this new funding channel. Read more.


Exploring Sound Integration of People-Centered Health Services
Last month, GHC member RTI International held a panel discussion exploring areas of action and measurement on integrated health service delivery. The discussion focused on how to further build the evidence base for the integration of health services and touched on topics, including people-centered approaches, governance, public-private collaboration, health information, and financing. In a recent medium blog, Christina Bisson, Senior Health Systems Strengthening Specialist at RTI International, highlights some of the top takeaways from the event. You can also listen to the full recording of the panel session and follow the online discussion for a complete event recap.

 

We cannot afford to leave women out

This guest post was written by Catharine Taylor, Vice President, Health Programs Group, Management Sciences for Health.

Photo: Women in Malawi are increasingly engaging in sustainable ways to grow household income and end poverty. Credit: Feed the Children / Amos Gumulira

The evidence is clear: to achieve progress in the world, now is the time to prioritize and invest in women and girls. As key drivers of sustainable development, when women are empowered to fully participate in society, everyone benefits. We know, for instance, that women spend more of their income on their families than men do – prioritizing healthcare, nutrition, and education, setting up families and communities for more prosperous futures. We also know that when women are empowered to care for themselves and their children’s health from pregnancy through childhood and adolescence, families and communities grow stronger and more productive.

As I prepare to join the Commission on the Status of Women next week, where the focus will be on women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work, I am reminded of a visit to Malawi last month. For many years, women in the country’s remote villages had no access to health care during pregnancy and childbirth, which meant no information on how to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy for themselves and their baby, and no care if and when complications arose, almost certainly resulting in death. But now, more than 90 percent of all women in Malawi go to a health care facility to deliver their children, up from only 53 percent in 2000. The investments in midwifery education and an expanding system to make healthcare free for the poorest have greatly contributed to better quality of care and improved health outcomes. Women’s participation in Village Savings and Loans associations, agribusiness groups, and livestock activities has increased markedly in the past few years, securing women‘s access to household income and greater engagement in non-traditional roles.

The power of investing in women is paying off.

Today, there’s a new generation of young Malawian women who are finding that family planning tools are helping them take charge of their futures. And there are more and more women confronting barriers to education and adding their voice in the workforce or in political spheres. By focusing on women and children, the country has also made incredible progress in addressing the HIV and AIDS epidemic, reducing the number of new HIV infections per year by more than half in just over ten years.

Under the new sustainable development agenda, countries and development actors from across the spectrum have an opportunity to work together to help communities ensure that women and girls have access to a comprehensive range of services promoting their right to health. On International Women’s Day, we at Management Sciences for Health mark the achievements of women and call for continued recognition that investments in global development programs yield a return that improves our security, prosperity, and advances the values of our nation. By helping women drive development to advance their health and well-being and that of their families, their communities, and societies, we will build lasting change that benefits all.


Catharine Taylor is the Vice President of the Health Programs Group at Management Sciences for Health – a leading organization dedicated to building stronger health systems for greater health impact. Catharine is an internationally recognized expert in maternal, newborn, and child health policies and programs, a champion for women’s health and rights, and an advocate for universal, equitable access to high-quality care. Follow Catharine on twitter @CTaylor_MSHVeep.