GHC News Flash: Global Health Roundup 10/9/15

OGP Declaration on Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Open Government Partnership
(OGP) invites civil society organizations to endorse the OGP Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The declaration recognizes the importance of transparency, accountability and citizen engagement for successful implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. The declaration is expected to be adopted by all 66 OGP member countries in late October in Mexico City. To endorse the declaration, send an email to sdg@opengovpartnership.org. Read more.

International HIV/AIDS Alliance gets a new ED
Christine Stegling is the newly appointed Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance. A leading actor in the HIV response, Ms. Stegling has worked for over 20 years in international development, human rights and HIV. Read more about her background and new role.

Global Handwashing Day
Global Handwashing Day is October 15! This is an opportunity for organizations in the health sector to encourage people to wash their hands as well as highlight the importance of handwashing with soap as an effective and affordable intervention. Consider tweeting, retweeting, posting content on Instagram, Facebook or Snapchat or take a handwashing selfie using the hashtag #GlobalHandwashingDay. Check out this Social Media Toolkit highlighting suggestions on how to get involved.

WBG Report on Universal Health Coverage
A recent World Bank Group report shows that more countries around the world are rolling out universal health coverage programs designed to expand access to health care and reduce the number of people impoverished by paying for the health care they need. The report, Going Universal: How 24 countries are implementing universal health coverage reforms from the bottom up, looks at how 24 countries have embarked on the path to universal health coverage and are expanding coverage to the poor, who too often get much less from their health systems than the better-off.