Statement

Washington, DC Advocacy Groups Commend National Governments for Committing to Reduce the Noncommunicable Disease Burden Worldwide

New York, NY (September 27, 2018) – Global Health Council (GHC) and the Noncommunicable Disease (NCD) Roundtable, welcomes today’s High-Level Meeting (HLM) on NCDs and commends governments for reaffirming their commitments to reducing the burdens of NCDs, including the long overdue commitment to address mental health, and the recognition that depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Ultimately, the value of this meeting will be demonstrated by the actions governments, donors, and civil society take to accelerate implementation.

“The burden of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries is growing, and it is critical that we stand with people living with NCDs to ensure they have access to necessary services and support,” stated Loyce Pace, Global Health Council President and Executive Director. “This convening offers an opportunity for countries to reaffirm their commitment to prevent and control NCDs, with a particular focus on affected communities with limited resources.”

GHC and the NCD Roundtable call for an emphasis on expanding coverage, to ensure that all people–including the poorest and most marginalized–benefit from prevention and are able to seek treatment and care. This will require greater multisectoral collaboration across public and private entities, as well as looking at other sectors, including technology and finance, to realize solutions. There must be clear targets and strong financial commitments to reach those implementation goals, requiring transparency and accountability from all stakeholders. This is not just a matter of principle; it is necessary to ensure sustainable economic development, as indirect and direct costs related to NCDs cripple productivity and threaten economies at all income levels.[i]

“This meeting is important because it will provide an opportunity for senior U.S. officials to join other leaders from around the world in recommitting to reducing the global burden of NCDs, which takes a toll on public health, on families and communities, and on economies,” stated Aaron Emmel, NCD Roundtable Co-Chair and Manager of Global Health Advocacy Initiatives at the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In addition to adopting the commitments stated in the Political Declaration, we urge governments to continue to work towards:

1.) Concrete global and national targets with mechanisms for accountability. Targets and action steps should be aligned as closely as possible with those emerging from the HLM on Tuberculosis, which took place on September 26. We believe there is still more work to do in this regard.

2.) Meaningful civil society engagement. We strongly support OP16 in the Political Declaration and believe governments, civil society (including patient and family advocacy groups, nonprofit organizations, academia, health professional associations, and faith-based organizations), and for-profit companies all have a stake in reducing the burden of NCDs.

3.) Adoption of a life-course approach. The support for a life-course approach is significant and must be supported in programs and funding. Although there are no age restrictions in the UN Sustainable Development Agenda’s target for NCDs, the World Health Organization’s attention to premature deaths from NCDs focuses solely on the 30-70 age range. This excludes millions of children, adolescents and young people who live with or are affected by NCDs, and many die prematurely or suffer long-term disabilities as a result. We will not be able to meet our global commitments, or sustain them, until this is corrected.

“Just as importantly, this is a call to action—to build up our health systems and turn those commitments into practical, sustained work on the ground that reaches the people who have been left out for so long,” said Emmel. “What’s significant about this meeting is that governments are agreeing to new approaches: to tackling mental health, to recognizing the importance of access to prevention and health services starting with children and across people’s lives, to listening to patients and making them partners in care, and to paying attention to the role of our environments on health. These insights all require a new way of working, and there’s a way for every sector of society to be involved, including with adequate budgets and strong political will from our governments.”

Addressing and incorporating these priorities are critical to reducing the number of NCD-related deaths and achieving universal health coverage, especially in low- and middle-income countries. GHC and the NCD Roundtable look forward to working together in continued collaboration with public and private entities to help people lead healthier, longer lives and reduce the toll NCDs take on our global economy.

[i] Council on Foreign Relations. The Emerging Global Health Crisis: Noncommunicable Diseases in Low-and Middle-Income Countries. New York: Council on Foreign Relations. 2014. Page 38.

###

About the NCD Roundtable

The NCD Roundtable is a diverse coalition of over 60 organizations, including NGOs representing development and humanitarian settings, professional associations, academic institutions and companies, united to raise awareness and address the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in the developing world. Learn more at www.ncdroundtable.org.

About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision-makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

 

Global Health Council (GHC) Welcomes Legislation Extending PEPFAR

WASHINGTON, DC (August 9, 2018) – This week, Global Health Council welcomed the introduction of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Extension Act of 2018 on Friday, August 3 by the U.S. House of Representatives. The legislation, sponsored by Representatives Chris Smith (R-NJ), Barbara Lee (D-CA), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL), Karen Bass (D-CA), Ed Royce (R-CA), and Eliot Engel (D-NY), reauthorizes PEPFAR for five years and reaffirms the bipartisan support and commitment to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

“We know that investments in global health work, and PEPFAR is a prime example of that,” stated Loyce Pace, President and Executive Director of Global Health Council. “Over the past 15 years, PEPFAR has had an impact on the lives of those living with HIV/AIDS, as well as building health systems to address malaria, TB, and maternal and child health. By renewing our commitment to this groundbreaking initiative, we emphasize its value and pave the way for even more global health progress worldwide.

Since its inception, PEPFAR has supported HIV treatments for more than 13.3 million people around the world, and has put us in reach of an AIDS-free generation with more than 2.2 million babies born HIV-free.

Global Health Council looks forward to working with policymakers and community stakeholders toward the goal of an AIDS-free generation.

***

About Global Health Council

Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision-makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Media Contact

Elizabeth Kohlway
Senior Manager, External Affairs and Operations
Global Health Council
(703) 717-5251

Global Health Security Roundtable Welcomes Additional U.S. Funding for Ebola Response

Washington, DC (May 23, 2018) — The Global Health Security Roundtable welcomes U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar’s announcement that the U.S. is contributing an additional $7 million in response to the evolving Ebola crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), bringing the total U.S. commitment to $8 million. From May 8 – 21, the outbreak has led to 58 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases, including 27 deaths, and the number of cases is expected to increase.

This recent outbreak illustrates the continuing threat of infectious diseases to the United States and the world, and the outstanding need to more effectively finance prevention, detection, and response. While the Roundtable is encouraged to see today’s announcement of additional support, it is critical to note that this commitment comes just two weeks after a proposed $252 million rescission of Ebola supplemental funding, which Congress allocated in 2015 to assist with comparable future outbreaks.

History has shown us that as successful public health interventions stem an outbreak or lead to an overall decline in infectious disease rates, public funding for those very programs is subsequently cut in favor of other priorities, leaving us vulnerable to the next infectious disease threat. The Global Health Security Roundtable calls on the Administration and Congress to prioritize future and preventive investments in preparedness, and notes that it should not come at the expense of other lifesaving global health and development programs, which often serve as the backbone of health security programming. Additionally, the Roundtable reiterates the need for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other U.S. agencies to have access to the same types of financing as the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Emergency Response Fund, in support of a comprehensive U.S. response to outbreaks such as that in the DRC.

The ongoing threat that epidemics and pandemics pose to U.S. health, economic, and national security interests demands dedicated and sustained funding for global health security, with a concerted focus on enabling low- and middle-income countries to strengthen their capabilities in proven public health interventions. Although it may be impossible to completely prevent the emergence and spread of infectious threats, the United States and the world can be much better prepared, coming together behind a comprehensive U.S. strategy for outbreaks, robust investments, and continued vigilance both at home and abroad.

***
About the Global Health Security Roundtable

Managed by Global Health Council and chaired by Beth Cameron (Nuclear Threat Initiative), Carolyn Reynolds (PATH), and Annie Toro (U.S. Pharmacopeia)—the Global Health Security Roundtable is a diverse coalition of over 40 organizations that seek to provide effective tools for U.S. Congress and the current administration on the importance of investments in global health security.

About Global Health Council

Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Media Contact

Liz Kohlway, Senior Manager, External Affairs & Operations
Global Health Council
ekohlway@globalhealth.org
(703) 717-5283

Global Health Council Rejects Proposed Cuts to Global Health Programs and U.S. Foreign Assistance

Washington, DC (February  12, 2018) — Today the Trump administration released its proposed budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 that contains a 30 percent decrease in the foreign affairs budget, including global health programs, at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Department of State. In addition, cuts were recommended for programs at the Department of Health and Human Services that support global health, global health research and development, and global health security. These proposed cuts undermine the impact of previous U.S. investments, as well as the leadership role the United States has in the world.

At a time when we are in sight of achieving an AIDS-free generation, ending preventable child and maternal deaths, and eradicating polio, Global Health Council is deeply concerned that drastic budget cuts would roll back these milestones, as well as slow efforts to strengthening global responses to disease outbreaks such as Zika and Ebola.

“For the second year in a row, the Trump administration has gutted foreign assistance and global health programs, which not only jeopardize the gains we have made in global health, but also our commitments to build stronger, more self-reliant communities around the world,” stated Loyce Pace, President and Executive Director of Global Health Council. “The President’s budget document acknowledges the importance of these programs and the process of transitioning countries from aid to self-reliance, but cuts the very programs that will help to get them there.”

Last year, Congress soundly rejected President Trump’s budget for FY2018. Global Health Council calls on Congress to do the same this year by continuing to support global health and development programs in International Affairs account. Funding these critical accounts that support health, WASH, education, nutrition, and gender programs, as well as humanitarian responses, ultimately strengthens U.S. leadership around the world and fosters a safer, more prosperous America.

Appropriations Budget Table (as of February 2018)

Key accounts (in thousands):

###

About Global Health Council

Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org. Global Health Council published “Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities,” comprehensive consensus recommendations and impact stories available at www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Follow GHC on Twitter or “Like” us on Facebook for more information about our #IHeartGlobalHealth campaign.

View the PDF statement.

Media Contacts

Danielle Heiberg, Senior Advocacy Manager  
Global Health Council
dheiberg@globalhealth.org
(703) 717-5286