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2017 GLOBAL HEALTH BRIEFING BOOK LAUNCH: PHOTO GALLERY

On February 15, 2017, GHC launched the Global Health Briefing Book on Capitol Hill.  Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities is an online resource for members of U.S. Congress and their staff. This biennial publication provides a comprehensive set of statistics and impact stories illustrating how the United States has been a leader in global health over the past decade. There are 18 briefs in total that address some of the most pressing global health issues, from maternal and child health to global health security. This resource builds the case for global health across multiple priorities and stakeholders. To learn more about the briefing book, read the press release.

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Global Health Works: Social Media Toolkit

About

Global Health Council, in collaboration with the global health advocacy community, provides the Global Health Briefing Book as a resource to document how U.S. investments have made a difference in people’s lives around the world. These briefs represent the work of a wide group of global health experts. The Global Health Briefing Book demonstrates how integrating and coordinating global health programs lead to overall improved health of individuals worldwide.

The launch of the briefing book took place on February 15, 2017 on Capitol Hill with members of Congress and their staff and the global health advocacy community.

We appreciate your help in spreading the word about the publication, which is available online at: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Below are prepared tweets for you to use as they are, or you can adapt them to reflect your organization’s programs.

Remember to tag @GlobalHealthOrg and use the primary hashtag #GlobalHealthWorks.

For questions, please contact dheiberg@globalhealth.org.


General Posts

{SHARE} @GlobalHealthOrg launches #GlobalHealthWorks briefing book for the 115th Congress. Access it here: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org

{SHARE} @GlobalHealthOrg newest version of #globalhealth briefing book is here! Browse it: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org #GlobalHealthWorks

{SHARE} Looking for a resource on #globalhealth? Check out @GlobalHealthOrg #GlobalHealthWorks briefing book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org


Issue Areas

Peruse the issue areas, or jump down to the issue you would like to promote:

 


Disability

Twitter
{SHARE} #GlobalHealthWorks to provide support to people living with disabilities. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lR1lbO pic.twitter.com/WJ3kdfpGjs

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Facebook
Did you know that emergency contexts, including refugee migration, natural disasters, wars and conflicts, or disease outbreaks, are likely to cause new disabilities, and affect those persons already living with disabilities? Learn more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org. @GlobalHealthWorks

Family Planning & Reproductive Health

Twitter
{SHARE} U.S. investments in #FPRH are essential to advancing #SDG3 & #SDG5 +Info: http://bit.ly/2kSFbZ0 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/rgOzFI2iYX

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Facebook
Robust investments in family planning and reproductive health are essential to achieving #genderequality and ending preventable maternal and child deaths globally. In 2016, 27 million people received contraceptive services through U.S.-funded programs. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Frontline Health Workers

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{SHARE} Investment in health workers bears tremendous economic returns. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lhmTSc #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/5Lu7P8bOt7

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Facebook
The U.S. government’s goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths, achieving an AIDS-free generation, and ensuring global health security cannot be achieved without significantly increasing support to strengthen the global frontline health workforce. Read more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org #HealthWorkersCount #GlobalHealthWorks

Global Health Security

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{SHARE} #GlobalHealthSecurity matters because diseases are borderless! +Info: http://bit.ly/2lhAqt2 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/YEx9FXTTpD

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Over 31,000 epidemiologists in 72 countries have been trained on how to detect and rapidly respond to outbreaks, which protects Americans from disease epidemics and promotes global health security. Learn more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.  #GlobalHealthWorks

Health in Humanitarian Response

Twitter
{SHARE} Health Systems in fragile states continue to serve populations in need: http://bit.ly/2lhoEz0 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/lA0jA7vEo1

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Facebook
Health systems in fragile states tend to be overextended and struggle to meet the needs of vulnerable populations. They require global support! The U.S. government should remain a global leader in humanitarian health response. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Health Research and Development

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{SHARE} New R&D tools benefit both domestic and global health security. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lL9aDT #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/h9GRf4ofMD

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Facebook
Ground-breaking innovations should be at the heart of our efforts to prepare for the next #epidemic. U.S investments in R&D will help ensure we never face another Zika, Ebola, or Yellow Fever outbreak. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Health Systems Strengthening (HSS)

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{SHARE} Key recommendations for strengthening #healthsystems worldwide: http://bit.ly/2ljnTVq #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/NDCCHbAKiy

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Facebook
Functioning public and private #healthsystems are essential to the success of disease-specific health initiatives and to meeting the U.S. global health goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

HIV/AIDS

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{SHARE} Sustained U.S. investments can help reach vulnerable populations to #EndAIDS by 2030. +Info: http://bit.ly/2l8gvKB  pic.twitter.com/XtJlCav4K6



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Facebook
Through U.S. government investments in global HIV/AIDS programming, the U.S. is leading the world toward remarkable progress against the epidemic and achieving the 90–90–90 global goals by 2020. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Malaria

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{SHARE} @PMIgov has made significant strides in eradicating malaria. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQHd9w #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/piLgA3CvRK

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Facebook
Funding from the U.S government has helped steer malaria-elimination efforts worldwide. Some of the most endemic regions, such as the Southern Province of Zambia, have recorded up to ten-fold declines in malaria cases and deaths over the last 15 years. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Maternal and Child Health

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{SHARE} Since 1990, maternal and child deaths have been halved. +Info: http://bit.ly/2ljY33H #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/ELKgOw26VV

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Facebook
Since 1990, the annual number of child and maternal deaths has been more than halved. Continued U.S leadership and support, through bilateral partnerships and multilateral stakeholder is needed to achieve further progress in ending preventable child and maternal deaths globally. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

mHealth

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{SHARE} U.S.-funded #mHealth programs link pregnant women to health services: http://bit.ly/2kxLMVt #GlobalHealthWorks  pic.twitter.com/BHNlHM9CIZ

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Facebook
South Africa’s MomConnect project sends text messages to pregnant women and new mothers to help them care for themselves and their children and encourages them to seek health care. More stories on #mHealth in the Global Health Briefing Book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org  #GlobalHealthWorks

Neglected Tropical Disease (NTDs)

Twitter
{SHARE} With continued U.S. leadership and support, we can #BeatNTDs! +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQKgPp. #GlobalHealthWorks  pic.twitter.com/D89MmWTM3T

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Facebook
Since 2014, the USAID NTD Program has been investing in research and development to ensure that promising new breakthrough medicines can be rapidly evaluated, registered, and made available to patients afflicted with neglected tropical diseases. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs)

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{SHARE} U.S. investments are leading global action against NCDs! Learn how: http://bit.ly/2kqjFMN #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/mEM5WHs1Of

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Facebook
In the global effort to address NCDs, cost is not the problem, inaction is. Over the next 15 years, economic losses from NCDs are projected to reach $47 trillion. U.S. global health investments in low- and middle-income countries can help curb this threat. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Nutrition

Twitter
{SHARE} Adequate #nutrition is essential to child survival & development. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQq7Zt #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/8r3XSuUvi4

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Integration of nutrition in early child development programs will improve child survival rates and help the next generation reach its full potential. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Twitter
{SHARE} Learn what U.S. involvement with @UN agencies means for #globalhealth: http://bit.ly/2lQE5uC #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/9dQaMd8OyS

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Facebook
U.S. global health priorities and investments are critical contributions to achieving #SDG3. Investments in cross-cutting health concerns such as WASH, malaria, HIV/AIDS, and nutrition, have helped millions of children reached their 5th birthday who might otherwise not have, and has reduced preventable maternal deaths by half. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Tuberculosis (TB)

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{SHARE} @USAID’s efforts to #EndTB are yielding tremendous results! +Info: http://bit.ly/2kpQDNm #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/NbYttBAUph
{SHARE} @USAID @USAIDGH’s TB programs link suspect #TB patients to testing & treatment services. +Info: http://bit.ly/2kpQDNm #GlobalHealthWorks

 

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Facebook
In FY 2015, with investments of $242 million focused primarily in 23 countries with bilateral TB funds, the U.S. government assisted more than 70,000 people with MDR-TB gain access to appropriate treatment. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Vaccines and Immunization

Twitter
{SHARE} #Vaccines save lives! Another example of how and why #GlobalHealthWorks +Info: http://bit.ly/2kxDDQB @GAVI pic.twitter.com/9b4kNg4eVC

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Facebook
Through USAID, the U.S. government invests annually in Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, which has supported the immunization of nearly 580 million children since 2000 and prevented approximately 8 million deaths. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)

Twitter

{SHARE} Investments in #WASH improve health across sectors including; #nutrition #genderequality. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lKZf0Y  pic.twitter.com/SDSdRitYzX

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Facebook
As of 2015, more than 7.6 million people have received improved access to drinking water supply and more than 4.3 million people have received improved access to sanitation. Learn more about the impacts of WASH in the Global Health Briefing Book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org. #GlobalHealthWorks

 

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Global Health Council Launches Global Health Briefing Book for U.S. Congress

WASHINGTON, Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Global Health Council (GHC) will release its publication Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities today at a launch event on Capitol Hill. This biennial publication provides a comprehensive set of statistics and impact stories illustrating how the United States has been a leader in global health over the past decade. There are 18 briefs in total that address some of the most pressing global health issues, from maternal and child health to global health security. This resource builds the case for global health across multiple priorities and stakeholders.

Non-governmental organizations, corporate entities, and academic institutions contributed to consensus recommendations for the U.S. Congress that reflect the greatest gains and opportunities in global health. Global Health Works is a representation of the global health community standing shoulder-to-shoulder in support of continued U.S. investments that focus on our common ground.

“While each individual health priority has its own special story and path, the joint global health narrative is more powerful: Collectively, we are changing lives every day while improving the U.S.’ international role,” stated Loyce Pace, President and Executive Director of GHC.

Rather than identifying “best practices” or choosing between global health priorities or funding streams, GHC and its members and partners recognize the value of thinking and working holistically across organizations and programs to leverage their respective resources and best serve individuals and communities in need worldwide. Global Health Works provides a foundation for understanding the critical need for Congress to maintain support for global health and continue U.S. leadership in international development.

Global Health Works is also accessible online at http://ghbb.globalhealth.org. Individual briefs and stories are available to download and share.

About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Follow GHC on Twitter or “Like” us on Facebook.

Media Contact
Elizabeth Kohlway
Communications & Member Engagement Manager
Global Health Council
(703) 717-5251

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GLOBAL HEALTH COUNCIL AND GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWS PROGRAM II ANNOUNCE THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL HEALTH 2017 (#TFGH17)

Changing Face of Global Health the Central Issue at Washington, DC’s Most Innovative Unconference

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10, 2017 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Global Health Council (GHC) and the Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP) II announced today that registration is open for the much-anticipated The Future of Global Health 2017 (#TFGH17) unconference. In a time of transition and increased uncertainty for global health funding and programs, this annual event underscores GHC and GHFP-II’s commitment to equipping the next generation of global health professionals with the knowledge and networks necessary to navigate the shifting field. This year, the event will feature information on grassroots involvement in global health issues and engage attendees in how to make their voices heard in 2017.

WHAT:
#TFGH17 provides attendees with a chance to connect with experienced global health practitioners through one-on-one mentoring sessions and discussion groups. Industry veterans will lead intimate, focused conversation hubs on topics ranging from Just locker room banter? The gender-equality path to health to Leadership change: What lies ahead with a new U.S. president, UN Secretary General, and WHO Director General?  Dedicated 10-minute one-on-one mentoring sessions provide emerging leaders with a unique opportunity to network and confer with seasoned professionals. Last year’s event drew more than 300 attendees.

WHERE:
The Hamilton Live
600 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 787-1000

WHEN: 
March 1, 2017
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

HOW:
General admission tickets are available for $35 per person at TFGH17.eventbrite.com, and GHC members and GHFP-II fellows receive a special rate of $25 per person. Organizations interested in partnership and visibility opportunities are invited to contact GHC with inquiries.

OTHER:
GHFP-II will host a #TFGH17 Social Media Photo Contest and a selected photo entry winner (1) will receive two roundtrip Delta airline tickets to any destination in the continental U.S.

To enter, you must attend #TFGH17, share a photo on Twitter or Instagram, tag @GHFPII, and use the #TFGH17 hashtag. Also, the submission should include a short caption about your contribution to the “Next Generation of Global Health Professionals.” You can submit as many entries as you like, but photos will be judged on originality, strength of caption, and image quality. All entries must be publicly searchable to qualify and be posted by 11:59 PM EST on March 1, 2017.


About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Follow GHC on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

About the Global Health Fellows Program II
The Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP) II, led by the Public Health Institute (PHI), helps USAID address its immediate and emerging human capital needs by developing a diverse group of global health professionals to support and sustain the effectiveness of the Agency’s current and future health programs. At different stages of their careers, this cadre of global health talent is motivated, technically excellent, well-supported, representative of the diversity of the American people and committed to contributing to USAID’s success in key global health priority areas. Learn more at www.ghfp.net.

Follow GHFP-II and connect with our Global Health Fellows on TwitterLinkedIn, or like us on Facebook.

Media Contacts
Ann Wheatley, Vice President
Global Impact – Secretariat for the Global Health Council
(703) 717-5224
ann.wheatley@charity.org

Angelina Gordon, Director, Communications, Outreach and Diversity
Global Health Fellows Program-II
(202) 808-3800
agordon@ghfp.net

 

 

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GHC NEWS FLASH: GLOBAL HEALTH ROUNDUP 2/6/2017


Highlights from the 140th WHO Executive Board Session

GHC hosted a delegation of its members representing multiple sectors and priorities to the recent WHO Executive Board (EB) session (January 23 – February 1). GHC delegates tracked the discussion of key agenda items ranging from global health security and polio to R&D and non-communicable diseases, and some read statements to the EB on these topics. They also had an opportunity to liaise with Member State representatives, including a joint meeting with the U.S. delegation and WHO staff. Reactions to the statements and additional takeaways from the meeting will be posted to GHC’s blog, The Collective Voice. For those interested, GHC will open the application process for its delegation to World Health Assembly (WHA) in May next month.

During the WHO EB session, three remaining candidates for the position of WHO Director-General were announced. Ethiopia’s Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Pakistan’s Sania Nishtar, and Britain’s David Nabarro will face off in a final vote to be cast by WHO Member States at WHA. GHC will continue to provide updates on this election process.


Addendum Issued to Global Financing Facility (GFF) Report
In the fall of 2015, GHC member RESULTS commissioned Global Health Visions and Catalysts for Change to undertake an analysis of civil society engagement and consultation in the development of Investment Cases in the four GFF front-runner countries. The analysis provided insights on successes and challenges in civil society engagement reported by key stakeholders, as well as lessons learned and recommendations for enhancing civil society engagement moving forward. An addendum has been developed to supplement the original report with more current information. View the addendum.


Johns Hopkins Hosts Health Systems Summer Institute
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is hosting its Health Systems Summer Institute from June 12 to June 23. The Institute provides public health professionals with the skills necessary to address the key health systems issues of today. The courses are a great way for early- and mid-career professionals to expand their skill sets and improve their job performance. Last year’s participants came from organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Jhpiego, and the National Cancer Institute. Registration officially opens on February 13. Visit the Institute’s website for more information.


Zika: One Year Later
On February 1, 2016, WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan announced that the Zika virus was a public health emergency of international concern. Following its appearance in the Americas in 2015, cases of the outbreak have since been identified in 70 countries worldwide, including regions in Asia, Africa, and the Western Pacific. Zika has once again revealed the weaknesses in our global preparedness to handle epidemics. However, the global community has demonstrated a strong and united front in responding to Zika, with more than 60 global and local partners, including WHO, committing to sustained and long-term efforts to combat the disease. Recent studies have helped identify potential surveillance systems to provide early warning of Zika outbreaks in low-resource countries. Read the latest statement on Zika from Dr. Chan..


2nd Annual Aid & Development Summit 
The 2nd annual Aid & Development Africa Summit will take place from February 28 to March 1 in Nairobi, Kenya with an aim to explore how best practices can improve aid delivery and development strategy in sub-Saharan East Africa. Over 300 decision-makers from a variety of sectors, including: government, NGOs, development banks, and the private sector, will gather to discuss innovations in areas such as health and WASH; maternal and child health; and communicable diseases. If you are a GHC member and would like to be a part of the Summit, email marketing@aidforum.org.

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