Advocacy Hub

  • All
  • GFF Update
  • Post-2015 Update
Make Aid Go Further: A Brief for Congress and the President

Eight of America’s top ten export markets are former aid recipients, and all are now close U.S. allies. Not only does support for global development advance U.S. economic, diplomatic, political, and security interests, but it is also an expression of America’s core values in ensuring that every individual has a fair chance to achieve his or her potential and shape the world around them.

These briefs from Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN) provide information about the importance of foreign assistance. Access briefs.

 

0
Proposed White House Budget Cuts Risk Stalling Global Health Progress
Global Health Council Statement on President Trump’s Proposed Budget

Washington, DC (March 16, 2017)  Today President Donald Trump released a proposed budget that contains close to a one-third reduction in federal funding for the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). These cuts will have a significant impact on foreign assistance, which includes development and humanitarian assistance and funding to the UN, and will have a devastating effect on the world’s poor and have ripple effects for Americans.

Global Health Council is deeply concerned that these cuts to foreign assistance will include global health programs, which would roll back years of progress made in fighting diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and polio; improving maternal and child health; and strengthening global responses to disease outbreaks such as Zika and Ebola.

Foreign assistance accounts for just 1% of the overall federal budget, but this low cost of life-saving programs yields a significant return on U.S. investments. Surveys continually show many Americans support our leadership role in the world. With support from the United States, we are within sight of an AIDS-free generation; ending preventable child and maternal deaths; and eradicating polio, measles, and guinea worm. These investments in global health contribute to broader foreign policy goals, including stabilizing volatile areas, supporting overseas disaster response, and accelerating trade and development.

“The United States has helped millions of people transition out of poverty and live longer and healthier lives, which creates more stable and economically thriving countries. Along with defense and diplomacy, development is a critical part of our role in the global arena, and the proposed cuts jeopardize that role,” stated Loyce Pace, President and Executive Director of Global Health Council.

Global Health Council calls on Congress to continue to support foreign assistance, including global health programs, by supporting funding of $60 billion for Fiscal Year 2018. Funding these critical accounts that support health, WASH, education, nutrition, and gender programs, as well as humanitarian responses, ultimately strengthens U.S. leadership around the world and fosters a safer, more prosperous America.

###

About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org. Global Health Council published “Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities,” comprehensive consensus recommendations and impact stories available at www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

0
Immunization Financing

This resource guide from Results for Development has been designed to facilitate advocates, policymakers, and program managers in their roles.  It offers a collection of 26 brief documents on topics related to the cost and financing of national immunization programs in low- and middle-income countries. Some of the briefs explore possible financing sources. Others examine the components and drivers of immunization costs, planning and decision-making processes related to immunization programs and budgets, and the relationship between immunization and broader health system financing. The resource guide concludes with a set of country case studies that illustrate particular approaches or important challenges. Access resource guide.

1