Author: Global Health

  • All
  • Advocacy Hub
  • Advocacy Update
  • Blog Posts
  • GHC Announcements
  • News Center
Global Health Works: Social Media Toolkit

About

Global Health Council, in collaboration with the global health advocacy community, provides the Global Health Briefing Book as a resource to document how U.S. investments have made a difference in people’s lives around the world. These briefs represent the work of a wide group of global health experts. The Global Health Briefing Book demonstrates how integrating and coordinating global health programs lead to overall improved health of individuals worldwide.

The launch of the briefing book took place on February 15, 2017 on Capitol Hill with members of Congress and their staff and the global health advocacy community.

We appreciate your help in spreading the word about the publication, which is available online at: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Below are prepared tweets for you to use as they are, or you can adapt them to reflect your organization’s programs.

Remember to tag @GlobalHealthOrg and use the primary hashtag #GlobalHealthWorks.

For questions, please contact dheiberg@globalhealth.org.


General Posts

{SHARE} @GlobalHealthOrg launches #GlobalHealthWorks briefing book for the 115th Congress. Access it here: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org

{SHARE} @GlobalHealthOrg newest version of #globalhealth briefing book is here! Browse it: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org #GlobalHealthWorks

{SHARE} Looking for a resource on #globalhealth? Check out @GlobalHealthOrg #GlobalHealthWorks briefing book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org


Issue Areas

Peruse the issue areas, or jump down to the issue you would like to promote:

 


Disability

Twitter
{SHARE} #GlobalHealthWorks to provide support to people living with disabilities. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lR1lbO pic.twitter.com/WJ3kdfpGjs

Download this image


Facebook
Did you know that emergency contexts, including refugee migration, natural disasters, wars and conflicts, or disease outbreaks, are likely to cause new disabilities, and affect those persons already living with disabilities? Learn more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org. @GlobalHealthWorks

Family Planning & Reproductive Health

Twitter
{SHARE} U.S. investments in #FPRH are essential to advancing #SDG3 & #SDG5 +Info: http://bit.ly/2kSFbZ0 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/rgOzFI2iYX

Download this image

Facebook
Robust investments in family planning and reproductive health are essential to achieving #genderequality and ending preventable maternal and child deaths globally. In 2016, 27 million people received contraceptive services through U.S.-funded programs. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Frontline Health Workers

Twitter
{SHARE} Investment in health workers bears tremendous economic returns. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lhmTSc #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/5Lu7P8bOt7

Download this image

Facebook
The U.S. government’s goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths, achieving an AIDS-free generation, and ensuring global health security cannot be achieved without significantly increasing support to strengthen the global frontline health workforce. Read more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org #HealthWorkersCount #GlobalHealthWorks

Global Health Security

Twitter
{SHARE} #GlobalHealthSecurity matters because diseases are borderless! +Info: http://bit.ly/2lhAqt2 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/YEx9FXTTpD

Download this image

Facebook
Over 31,000 epidemiologists in 72 countries have been trained on how to detect and rapidly respond to outbreaks, which protects Americans from disease epidemics and promotes global health security. Learn more: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.  #GlobalHealthWorks

Health in Humanitarian Response

Twitter
{SHARE} Health Systems in fragile states continue to serve populations in need: http://bit.ly/2lhoEz0 #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/lA0jA7vEo1

Download this image

Facebook
Health systems in fragile states tend to be overextended and struggle to meet the needs of vulnerable populations. They require global support! The U.S. government should remain a global leader in humanitarian health response. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Health Research and Development

Twitter
{SHARE} New R&D tools benefit both domestic and global health security. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lL9aDT #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/h9GRf4ofMD

Download this image

Facebook
Ground-breaking innovations should be at the heart of our efforts to prepare for the next #epidemic. U.S investments in R&D will help ensure we never face another Zika, Ebola, or Yellow Fever outbreak. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Health Systems Strengthening (HSS)

Twitter
{SHARE} Key recommendations for strengthening #healthsystems worldwide: http://bit.ly/2ljnTVq #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/NDCCHbAKiy

Download this image

Facebook
Functioning public and private #healthsystems are essential to the success of disease-specific health initiatives and to meeting the U.S. global health goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

HIV/AIDS

Twitter
{SHARE} Sustained U.S. investments can help reach vulnerable populations to #EndAIDS by 2030. +Info: http://bit.ly/2l8gvKB  pic.twitter.com/XtJlCav4K6



Download this image

Facebook
Through U.S. government investments in global HIV/AIDS programming, the U.S. is leading the world toward remarkable progress against the epidemic and achieving the 90–90–90 global goals by 2020. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Malaria

Twitter
{SHARE} @PMIgov has made significant strides in eradicating malaria. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQHd9w #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/piLgA3CvRK

Download this image

Facebook
Funding from the U.S government has helped steer malaria-elimination efforts worldwide. Some of the most endemic regions, such as the Southern Province of Zambia, have recorded up to ten-fold declines in malaria cases and deaths over the last 15 years. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Maternal and Child Health

Twitter
{SHARE} Since 1990, maternal and child deaths have been halved. +Info: http://bit.ly/2ljY33H #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/ELKgOw26VV

Download this image

Facebook
Since 1990, the annual number of child and maternal deaths has been more than halved. Continued U.S leadership and support, through bilateral partnerships and multilateral stakeholder is needed to achieve further progress in ending preventable child and maternal deaths globally. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

mHealth

Twitter
{SHARE} U.S.-funded #mHealth programs link pregnant women to health services: http://bit.ly/2kxLMVt #GlobalHealthWorks  pic.twitter.com/BHNlHM9CIZ

Download this image

Facebook
South Africa’s MomConnect project sends text messages to pregnant women and new mothers to help them care for themselves and their children and encourages them to seek health care. More stories on #mHealth in the Global Health Briefing Book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org  #GlobalHealthWorks

Neglected Tropical Disease (NTDs)

Twitter
{SHARE} With continued U.S. leadership and support, we can #BeatNTDs! +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQKgPp. #GlobalHealthWorks  pic.twitter.com/D89MmWTM3T

Download this image

Facebook
Since 2014, the USAID NTD Program has been investing in research and development to ensure that promising new breakthrough medicines can be rapidly evaluated, registered, and made available to patients afflicted with neglected tropical diseases. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs)

Twitter
{SHARE} U.S. investments are leading global action against NCDs! Learn how: http://bit.ly/2kqjFMN #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/mEM5WHs1Of

Download this image

Facebook
In the global effort to address NCDs, cost is not the problem, inaction is. Over the next 15 years, economic losses from NCDs are projected to reach $47 trillion. U.S. global health investments in low- and middle-income countries can help curb this threat. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Nutrition

Twitter
{SHARE} Adequate #nutrition is essential to child survival & development. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lQq7Zt #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/8r3XSuUvi4

Download this image

Facebook
Integration of nutrition in early child development programs will improve child survival rates and help the next generation reach its full potential. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Twitter
{SHARE} Learn what U.S. involvement with @UN agencies means for #globalhealth: http://bit.ly/2lQE5uC #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/9dQaMd8OyS

Download this image

Facebook
U.S. global health priorities and investments are critical contributions to achieving #SDG3. Investments in cross-cutting health concerns such as WASH, malaria, HIV/AIDS, and nutrition, have helped millions of children reached their 5th birthday who might otherwise not have, and has reduced preventable maternal deaths by half. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Tuberculosis (TB)

Twitter
{SHARE} @USAID’s efforts to #EndTB are yielding tremendous results! +Info: http://bit.ly/2kpQDNm #GlobalHealthWorks pic.twitter.com/NbYttBAUph
{SHARE} @USAID @USAIDGH’s TB programs link suspect #TB patients to testing & treatment services. +Info: http://bit.ly/2kpQDNm #GlobalHealthWorks

 

Download this image


Facebook
In FY 2015, with investments of $242 million focused primarily in 23 countries with bilateral TB funds, the U.S. government assisted more than 70,000 people with MDR-TB gain access to appropriate treatment. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Vaccines and Immunization

Twitter
{SHARE} #Vaccines save lives! Another example of how and why #GlobalHealthWorks +Info: http://bit.ly/2kxDDQB @GAVI pic.twitter.com/9b4kNg4eVC

Download this image

Facebook
Through USAID, the U.S. government invests annually in Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, which has supported the immunization of nearly 580 million children since 2000 and prevented approximately 8 million deaths. Learn why #GlobalHealthWorks: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org.

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)

Twitter

{SHARE} Investments in #WASH improve health across sectors including; #nutrition #genderequality. +Info: http://bit.ly/2lKZf0Y  pic.twitter.com/SDSdRitYzX

Download this image

Facebook
As of 2015, more than 7.6 million people have received improved access to drinking water supply and more than 4.3 million people have received improved access to sanitation. Learn more about the impacts of WASH in the Global Health Briefing Book: www.ghbb.globalhealth.org. #GlobalHealthWorks

 

0
Global Health Roundup 2/20/2017
.
Global Health Community Demonstrates Why #GlobalHealthWorks
On February 15, GHC and the global health community were on Capitol Hill to launch the latest version of the Global Health Briefing Book, Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communitiesa set of community-led recommendations for policymakers regarding global health priorities. Earlier in the day, GHC members and partners visited congressional offices to share statistics and stories of returns on U.S. investments. The day culminated with an expo of stakeholders across multiple sectors showcasing their work and impact in global health worldwide. GHC President and Executive Director Loyce Pace further delved into the significant return on investment from U.S. global health programs worldwide in a recent op-ed published by The Hill. In her op-ed, Loyce notes that for less than 1 percent of the federal budget, global health investments have yielded impressive results above and beyond their original price tag, and are poised for even greater returns in the future. View the briefing book, check out our Storify of the launch, and read Loyce’s op-ed.


Population Reference Bureau Releases New Data
New evidence suggests that the share of women and girls that have undergone female genital mutilation/cutting is declining in many countries, with girls less likely to be cut than in previous generations of women. A statistical wallchart from GHC member Population Reference Bureau (PRB), Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Data and Trends Update 2017, produced with support from U.S Agency for International Development (USAID), provides the latest data on the practice from 29 developing countries. Despite the declining prevalence in many countries, the total number of women and girls undergoing FGM/C continues to rise in absolute terms due to population growth. For more information, and to order a print version of the wallchart, please contact communications@prb.org.

WHO Model List for Essential Diagnostics Is Underway
Since 1977, the World Health Organization (WHO) has maintained a Model List for Essential Medicines (EML) to serve as reference document in conceiving procurement plans for medicines that meet the priority health needs of the population. The EML has been a global success, especially for low- and middle-income countries, offering guidance to governments, nonprofits, and development partners in the allocation of their health budgets. Last month, WHO released a long-awaited proposal for the development of a Model List for Essential Diagnostics (EDL). This follows calls by GHC member Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC) and other partners for the agency to establish an EDL for vital diagnostics to compliment the EML. Read more.



Friends of the Global Fight Collects Global Fund Advocacy Videos 
Since December 2016, GHC member Friends of the Global Fight to End AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (Friends of the Global Fight) has been building a case for sustained U.S. support of the Global Fund under the new administration and Congress. They are currently devising a new multimedia campaign, “The Letter,” to ensure that U.S. decision-makers hear these messages. The campaign will feature images of people directly impacted by Global Fund-supported programs. Friends of the Global Fight invites its partners to share video clips for its compilation. Please view this brief and sample video for guidance and inspiration on the general tone the campaign seeks to capture. The deadline for submission is February 28. For questions and support, please email friends@theglobalfight.org.

Women in Global Health Issues Call for Applications
Women in Global Health (WGH) believes that diverse, gender-balanced leadership is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and is working to give all genders an equal voice in the global health arena. WGH invites interested parties to join their team and help support their mission. Candidates from all genders, backgrounds, and stages of their career from around the world are welcome to apply for a number of available positions. Applications will remain open through February 28. Please send any questions to info@womeningh.org.

1
Promoting Women’s Leadership in Resource-Poor Settings

This guest post was written by Dr. Adnan A. Hyder of Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and originally appeared on the university website.

Dr. Adnan A. Hyder was one of the keynote speakers at the 7th International Womens Leaders Summit presented by New World Concepts in Karachi, Pakistan. He is Professor and Associate Chair, Department of International Health; Director of the Health Systems Program; and Director of the International Injury Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has 20 years of global health experience in low- and middle-income countries. With this background, Dr. Hyder leads a team of experts to conduct groundbreaking research on health systems strengthening and capacity building.

 
Women’s health has long been a central focus in the field of public health. It is well-known that many health disparities exist between men and women all over the world due to unequal access to basic health care and education. While certainly not specific to resource-poor settings, women tend to experience more discrimination and mistreatment in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where there are also higher rates of preventable deaths and disease. Because of societal structures and social pressures, women can have unequal power in sexual relationships, economic decision-making, and navigating reproductive and child health services (1). One of the most effective ways we can reduce this inequity is by promoting, supporting and fostering the next generation of women leaders in low- and middle-income countries.

Equity in leadership is desired in all fields, but it is especially important in the field of health and medicine where saving lives and reducing global health burdens is a core and urgent task. Women leaders are more likely to implement policies that target women and children, and are more likely to support antenatal care, health facilities and immunizations (2). When it is quite literally a matter of life and death, I believe that it is critical to address the gender gap in health leadership, especially when there is strength in working collaboratively and added value in community-building and diversity.

Lack of easily accessible female role models and difficulties balancing career and personal life contribute to the inequity in global health leadership (3). Women are put under enormous pressure to maintain a balance between family life and professional life, a burden that is even heavier for women in LMICs where they are often expected to prioritize family over education. Women in resource-poor settings also face the added challenges of abiding by social-cultural norms often set my men, facing daily hurdles in mobility, and unfriendly work environments.

In order to tackle some of the most pressing health issues, we need to encourage and support women’s leadership in health, especially in the most vulnerable parts of the world. It is crucial to do this work in a meaningful way by incorporating the views and lived experiences of those in the ‘global south’ into our policies and decision-making process, and by considering local priorities in ensuring equal access to education and resources. Gender equality is not just an issue for women but an issue for everyone and if we don’t strive to achieve it, we will continue to struggle with the burden of death, disease and disability worldwide.

References:

1 Deborah Derrick. Empowering women and girls: the impact of gender equality in global health.The Lancet Global Health Blog, 2014 Aug 8
2 Jennifer A. Downs, Lindsey K. Reif, Adolfine Hokororo, Daniel W. Fitzgerald. Increasing Women in Leadership in Global Health.US National Library of Medicine, 2015 Aug 1
3 Kelli Rogers. Why do women hold less than 25 percent of global health leadership roles?Devex, 2015 Feb 3

1
Greater Transparency Called for in Global Health Security

This guest post was written by GHC Board Chairman Dr. Jonathan Quick and was originally published on The Huffington Post website.

GHC Board Chairman Dr. Jonathan Quick

No More Epidemics (NME) is calling on all countries to publish their completed assessments of national capacities to prevent, detect and respond to epidemic threats, known as the Joint External Evaluation (JEE). Ethiopia, Liberia, Peru, Uganda, UK, and the US have openly shared theirs.

Data transparency and accountability are vital to address global health threats. Unless these documents are made public it will be impossible for civil society to either hold governments accountable for their obligations under the International Health Regulations (IHR), or to support governments in their compliance efforts.

More than 55 nations have joined the effort to combat highly infectious disease by signing on to the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), and a number of participating countries have undergone the multi-sectoral JEE and developed five-year national country roadmaps to address gaps in health infrastructure and capabilities. A number of countries have already completed a JEE. Another 27 countries are planning to undergo a JEE by May – yet, only 13 finalized JEEs and 12 country roadmaps are available online to the public.

Knowledge of baseline data provided by the JEE will result in more effective programming, prevention and detection of infectious disease outbreaks and early response. The JEE and roadmap processes are critical tools for civil society to use in developing appropriate and adequate programming to help countries close health systems gaps and become IHR-compliant. Transparency and accountability are vital in addressing global health threats.

No More Epidemics urges all countries carrying out their Joint External Evaluations to make the results publically available and for these to be made available on the World Health Organization’s Strategic Partnership Portal, the online repository for tracking funding, donor profiles and country level data.

ABOUT NME
No More Epidemics is a five-year global campaign to encourage governments and key stakeholders to better prevent, prepare and respond to infectious disease epidemics. Established in 2015 by Management Science for Health, International Medical Corps, Save the Children and the African Field Epidemiology Network, the Campaign was officially launched in November 2015 in South Africa. The Campaign seeks to ensure the development of national preparedness plans that include community protection and mitigation; ensure all States comply with the International Health Regulations; and increase international and national funding levels for epidemic preparedness, prevention and response.

0
GHC NEWS FLASH: GLOBAL HEALTH ROUNDUP 2/6/2017


Highlights from the 140th WHO Executive Board Session

GHC hosted a delegation of its members representing multiple sectors and priorities to the recent WHO Executive Board (EB) session (January 23 – February 1). GHC delegates tracked the discussion of key agenda items ranging from global health security and polio to R&D and non-communicable diseases, and some read statements to the EB on these topics. They also had an opportunity to liaise with Member State representatives, including a joint meeting with the U.S. delegation and WHO staff. Reactions to the statements and additional takeaways from the meeting will be posted to GHC’s blog, The Collective Voice. For those interested, GHC will open the application process for its delegation to World Health Assembly (WHA) in May next month.

During the WHO EB session, three remaining candidates for the position of WHO Director-General were announced. Ethiopia’s Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Pakistan’s Sania Nishtar, and Britain’s David Nabarro will face off in a final vote to be cast by WHO Member States at WHA. GHC will continue to provide updates on this election process.


Addendum Issued to Global Financing Facility (GFF) Report
In the fall of 2015, GHC member RESULTS commissioned Global Health Visions and Catalysts for Change to undertake an analysis of civil society engagement and consultation in the development of Investment Cases in the four GFF front-runner countries. The analysis provided insights on successes and challenges in civil society engagement reported by key stakeholders, as well as lessons learned and recommendations for enhancing civil society engagement moving forward. An addendum has been developed to supplement the original report with more current information. View the addendum.


Johns Hopkins Hosts Health Systems Summer Institute
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is hosting its Health Systems Summer Institute from June 12 to June 23. The Institute provides public health professionals with the skills necessary to address the key health systems issues of today. The courses are a great way for early- and mid-career professionals to expand their skill sets and improve their job performance. Last year’s participants came from organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Jhpiego, and the National Cancer Institute. Registration officially opens on February 13. Visit the Institute’s website for more information.


Zika: One Year Later
On February 1, 2016, WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan announced that the Zika virus was a public health emergency of international concern. Following its appearance in the Americas in 2015, cases of the outbreak have since been identified in 70 countries worldwide, including regions in Asia, Africa, and the Western Pacific. Zika has once again revealed the weaknesses in our global preparedness to handle epidemics. However, the global community has demonstrated a strong and united front in responding to Zika, with more than 60 global and local partners, including WHO, committing to sustained and long-term efforts to combat the disease. Recent studies have helped identify potential surveillance systems to provide early warning of Zika outbreaks in low-resource countries. Read the latest statement on Zika from Dr. Chan..


2nd Annual Aid & Development Summit 
The 2nd annual Aid & Development Africa Summit will take place from February 28 to March 1 in Nairobi, Kenya with an aim to explore how best practices can improve aid delivery and development strategy in sub-Saharan East Africa. Over 300 decision-makers from a variety of sectors, including: government, NGOs, development banks, and the private sector, will gather to discuss innovations in areas such as health and WASH; maternal and child health; and communicable diseases. If you are a GHC member and would like to be a part of the Summit, email marketing@aidforum.org.

0