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2017 GLOBAL HEALTH BRIEFING BOOK LAUNCH: PHOTO GALLERY

On February 15, 2017, GHC launched the Global Health Briefing Book on Capitol Hill.  Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities is an online resource for members of U.S. Congress and their staff. This biennial publication provides a comprehensive set of statistics and impact stories illustrating how the United States has been a leader in global health over the past decade. There are 18 briefs in total that address some of the most pressing global health issues, from maternal and child health to global health security. This resource builds the case for global health across multiple priorities and stakeholders. To learn more about the briefing book, read the press release.

Global Health Council Launches Global Health Briefing Book for U.S. Congress

WASHINGTON, Feb. 15, 2017 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Global Health Council (GHC) will release its publication Global Health Works: Maximizing U.S. Investments for Healthier and Stronger Communities today at a launch event on Capitol Hill. This biennial publication provides a comprehensive set of statistics and impact stories illustrating how the United States has been a leader in global health over the past decade. There are 18 briefs in total that address some of the most pressing global health issues, from maternal and child health to global health security. This resource builds the case for global health across multiple priorities and stakeholders.

Non-governmental organizations, corporate entities, and academic institutions contributed to consensus recommendations for the U.S. Congress that reflect the greatest gains and opportunities in global health. Global Health Works is a representation of the global health community standing shoulder-to-shoulder in support of continued U.S. investments that focus on our common ground.

“While each individual health priority has its own special story and path, the joint global health narrative is more powerful: Collectively, we are changing lives every day while improving the U.S.’ international role,” stated Loyce Pace, President and Executive Director of GHC.

Rather than identifying “best practices” or choosing between global health priorities or funding streams, GHC and its members and partners recognize the value of thinking and working holistically across organizations and programs to leverage their respective resources and best serve individuals and communities in need worldwide. Global Health Works provides a foundation for understanding the critical need for Congress to maintain support for global health and continue U.S. leadership in international development.

Global Health Works is also accessible online at http://ghbb.globalhealth.org. Individual briefs and stories are available to download and share.

About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Follow GHC on Twitter or “Like” us on Facebook.

Media Contact
Elizabeth Kohlway
Communications & Member Engagement Manager
Global Health Council
(703) 717-5251

GLOBAL HEALTH COUNCIL AND GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWS PROGRAM II ANNOUNCE THE FUTURE OF GLOBAL HEALTH 2017 (#TFGH17)

Changing Face of Global Health the Central Issue at Washington, DC’s Most Innovative Unconference

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10, 2017 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Global Health Council (GHC) and the Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP) II announced today that registration is open for the much-anticipated The Future of Global Health 2017 (#TFGH17) unconference. In a time of transition and increased uncertainty for global health funding and programs, this annual event underscores GHC and GHFP-II’s commitment to equipping the next generation of global health professionals with the knowledge and networks necessary to navigate the shifting field. This year, the event will feature information on grassroots involvement in global health issues and engage attendees in how to make their voices heard in 2017.

WHAT:
#TFGH17 provides attendees with a chance to connect with experienced global health practitioners through one-on-one mentoring sessions and discussion groups. Industry veterans will lead intimate, focused conversation hubs on topics ranging from Just locker room banter? The gender-equality path to health to Leadership change: What lies ahead with a new U.S. president, UN Secretary General, and WHO Director General?  Dedicated 10-minute one-on-one mentoring sessions provide emerging leaders with a unique opportunity to network and confer with seasoned professionals. Last year’s event drew more than 300 attendees.

WHERE:
The Hamilton Live
600 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 787-1000

WHEN: 
March 1, 2017
6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

HOW:
General admission tickets are available for $35 per person at TFGH17.eventbrite.com, and GHC members and GHFP-II fellows receive a special rate of $25 per person. Organizations interested in partnership and visibility opportunities are invited to contact GHC with inquiries.

OTHER:
GHFP-II will host a #TFGH17 Social Media Photo Contest and a selected photo entry winner (1) will receive two roundtrip Delta airline tickets to any destination in the continental U.S.

To enter, you must attend #TFGH17, share a photo on Twitter or Instagram, tag @GHFPII, and use the #TFGH17 hashtag. Also, the submission should include a short caption about your contribution to the “Next Generation of Global Health Professionals.” You can submit as many entries as you like, but photos will be judged on originality, strength of caption, and image quality. All entries must be publicly searchable to qualify and be posted by 11:59 PM EST on March 1, 2017.


About Global Health Council
Established in 1972, Global Health Council (GHC) is the leading membership organization supporting and connecting advocates, implementers, and stakeholders around global health priorities worldwide. GHC represents the collaborative voice of the community on key issues; we convene stakeholders around key priorities and actively engage with decision makers to influence global health policy. Learn more at www.globalhealth.org.

Follow GHC on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

About the Global Health Fellows Program II
The Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP) II, led by the Public Health Institute (PHI), helps USAID address its immediate and emerging human capital needs by developing a diverse group of global health professionals to support and sustain the effectiveness of the Agency’s current and future health programs. At different stages of their careers, this cadre of global health talent is motivated, technically excellent, well-supported, representative of the diversity of the American people and committed to contributing to USAID’s success in key global health priority areas. Learn more at www.ghfp.net.

Follow GHFP-II and connect with our Global Health Fellows on TwitterLinkedIn, or like us on Facebook.

Media Contacts
Ann Wheatley, Vice President
Global Impact – Secretariat for the Global Health Council
(703) 717-5224
ann.wheatley@charity.org

Angelina Gordon, Director, Communications, Outreach and Diversity
Global Health Fellows Program-II
(202) 808-3800
agordon@ghfp.net

 

 

Trump’s global gag rule silences doctors and midwives and harms their patients

This blog was written by Catharine Taylor and cross-posted from STAT

President Trump’s reinstatement of the Mexico City Policy, better known as the global gag rule, came as no surprise to anyone working in the field of global health. We have been through this before — in 1984, when the policy was first put into effect by President Reagan, and then in 1993, 2001, and 2009, when it was repealed, reinstated, and repealed again.

The Mexico City Policy is called a gag rule because it limits not just what organizations and health providers do but what they are permitted to say. It prevents foreign organizations that receive US government funding from performing abortions — even if they are using funds from non-US government sources and even if abortion is completely legal in their countries.

The global gag rule also steps right between a woman and her doctor, nurse, or midwife, preventing these frontline health providers from telling their patients about the full, legal range of health options available to them. It forbids trusted advisers from giving honest, comprehensive health advice and information. I started my career as a nurse-midwife, and then worked in maternal and newborn health programs in Africa and Asia, so I know what this will mean for the lives and health of women and their families.

For more than half a century, the US has invested, with great success, in programs to increase access to family planning and improve maternal, newborn, and child health, as well as prevent malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious diseases. The evidence couldn’t be clearer: America’s commitment has prevented millions of unintended pregnancies and saved millions of lives. It has reaped substantial savings in health care costs from each dollar invested in building strong, sustainable health systems. US-funded programs have strengthened families and communities, increased stability and prosperity, and contributed to improved health security for the entire world, and for our country as well.

My organization, Management Sciences for Health, works in partnership with countries around the world on behalf of the American people to efficiently and effectively invest US funding in projects and programs that work to save lives, increase well-being, and build more stable and secure societies.

While my organization will continue to comply with US-government policy, we are deeply concerned about the impact of the reinstatement and expansion of the global gag rule. It will force foreign organizations — many of them our project partners — to make a terrible choice: accept US funds but withhold full, accurate health information from their patients, or reject US funds and thus provide care to far fewer women.

When the global gag rule was previously in force, it applied only to foreign organizations that received funds from the US budget for family planning assistance. That meant the effects were mostly limited to organizations focused on contraceptive services.

But President Trump’s expanded policy will apply to any foreign organization that receives any US global health funding. That could mean endangering maternal and child health programs, efforts to fight the Zika virus, and the expansive PEPFAR program to stop HIV/AIDS, perhaps the most successful health aid program in US history.

Here’s what happened when the narrower policy was in place before: Clinics were closed, services were reduced, and there were more unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions.

will lose access to affordable, high-quality, comprehensive reproductive health care, and will be less able to make informed health choices. Health systems in countries that are now showing real, sustainable progress in improving population health will be weakened. Good organizations that do effective, lifesaving work will have to cut back their activities or go out of business. The US investment in global health will be much less effective.

Global health experts know that access to family planning and accurate, comprehensive health information saves lives. By restricting that access, the global gag rule does the opposite, harming the well-being and resiliency of families, communities, nations, and economies.

Organizations should not be disqualified from participating in US-funded health projects because they use their own funds to provide the accurate, comprehensive health information that their patients need, and services that are legal in their own countries. If they are, it is women who will pay the price.

Catharine Taylor is vice president for health programs at Management Sciences for Health, a nonprofit global health organization.

Certification of the 2016 Global Health Council Board of Directors Ratification


Certification of the 2016 Global Health Council Board of Directors Ratification

For the ratification of candidates for the Global Health Council’s Board of Directors:

The published response deadline was December 23, 2016. At the close of the ratification, 42 ballots were received. All 42 ballots were received electronically via Google Forms. There were 0 duplicate and 1 invalid ballot. After elimination of the invalid ballot, 41 ballots were counted as valid.

The 41 valid ballots received exceeded the quorum of 10% of the January 1, 2016 voting member population of 316 organizational and individual members.

The following is the tally of responses for all candidates placed on the ballot to fill seats on the Board of Directors:

Candidates:

Michael Tarnok
Joy Hamilton Marini

*Boards terms expire December 31, 2019

A majority of valid ballots having been cast for the candidates listed, they are hereby certified as elected.

Certified by:  Management Sciences for Health 01/10/2017